Ancient Olympics: Training

CS

The preparations for the Olympics in Ancient times started 10 months before the actual event and the also the Athletes had to swear an oath that they would be strict with their training; this rule would seem odd to a modern Olympian because 10 months of hared training would not make them stronger; it would just exhaust them.

With one month to go to the Olympics; Olympians would be required to reside at Ellis and be under the strict supervision of a group of people called the hellanodikai; at Ellis the market place was stripped and used as a practice track. This means the market place was an MPMP (a Multi-Purpose Market Place). With two days to go the Olympians made their way to Olympia for the Games and maybe a victor and lots of money or a goat.

Note: In Ancient times they didn’t have performance drugs so the world was a lot fairer except for the fact that the taxes were high and people were killed if they weren’t paid and the fact that the king or ruler was a blood thirsty tyrant most of the time.

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About emanuelolympics

Year Nine Classics sets out to compare the Ancient Olympic Games with those to be held in London in 2012.
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5 Responses to Ancient Olympics: Training

  1. gradver7ising says:

    Hmm, interesting! Sure does sound like a lot of training. Funny to think that the games has such dedicated approach even some time before the invention of Lucozade! Riveting!

  2. Theo says:

    Really fascinating writing. Great job Mr CS

    xxx

  3. Ariel_mo says:

    What an interesting post! I never thought about how much training, and preparation was needed for the Olympic games at that time. It really makes me appreciate the heritage of the London 2012 games- looking forward to it.

  4. Matt16 says:

    Good post- Really informative.

  5. Charlotte says:

    Very interesting to know the origins of the Olympics…there’s been a lot of changes

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